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Australian Republic: ex-monarchist Kyle Sandilands denounces the royal family


Kyle Sandilands, one of Australia’s most prominent monarchists, has said he will no longer support the British Royal Family once the Queen dies.

The radio presenter’s shifting allegiance could be a major blow to the Australian Republic Movement, led by rugby player-turned-journalist Peter FitzSimons.

Sandilands, 50, said on Monday he was a staunch supporter of the Queen but was not keen on Prince Charles becoming King of Australia.

Change of tone: Kyle Sandilands, one of Australia’s most prominent monarchists, has said he will no longer support the British Royal Family once the Queen dies

He was discussing how he would lead Australia if he became prime minister when he changed tack and said he would rather be president.

“If I was prime minister – and let’s face it, I don’t like prime ministers – when I’m the President… I expect us to make a democracy here,” he said.

When his co-host Jackie ‘O’ Henderson reminded him he was a monarchist, Sandilands said he was only loyal to Queen Elizabeth – not the royal family in general.

An Elizabethan, not a royalist: Sandilands, 50, said on Monday he was a staunch supporter of the Queen (pictured), but was not keen on Prince Charles becoming King of Australia

An Elizabethan, not a royalist: Sandilands, 50, said on Monday he was a staunch supporter of the Queen (pictured), but was not keen on Prince Charles becoming King of Australia

“I only love the queen. Not this dildo [Prince Charles] and this tampon that he is going to marry [Camilla, the future Queen Consort]. I don’t like it, he said.

This was a reference to an infamous transcript of a 1989 phone conversation between Charles and Camilla that was leaked to the press in 1993.

The six-minute phone call went into explicit detail as the longtime lovers fantasized about being intimate, with Charles saying he fantasized about being Camilla’s buffer.

At the time the conversation was recorded, Charles and Diana were still married, although their relationship was not good (they officially separated in 1992).

Henderson was shocked by her colleague’s hostility towards the Royal Family, saying, “How dare you!” He will soon be our king.

“Not my king. I’ll say no to that, Sandilands spat.

“Are you seriously not going to be a royalist once the queen dies?” Henderson asked, to which he replied, “It’s possible, yes.”

Pictured: Meghan and Harry posing with their newborn son Archie in May 2019

‘I almost had a coronary’: Sandilands has previously defended the Royal Family and in June condemned Prince Harry and Meghan Markle (right) for naming their daughter after the Queen

Sandilands has previously defended the Royal Family and in June condemned Prince Harry and Meghan Markle for naming their daughter after the Queen.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex named their daughter Lilibet (short for Lili) after her great-grandmother, who adopted the nickname when she was unable to pronounce her own name correctly.

‘I heard Brooklyn [Ross, KIIS FM’s newsreader] mention that at 5:30 this morning on the way home, and I almost had a coronary,” he said.

“I wasn’t happy because they want to distance themselves so much from the royal family, but every name [was inspired by royal family members]he raged.

“And then come the haters, who hate the royal family… and then they [name their daughter] Lilibet.’

Republicans: Kyle's shifting allegiance could be a coup for the Australian Republic Movement, led by rugby player-turned-journalist Peter FitzSimons (right, with wife Lisa Wilkinson)

Republicans: Kyle’s shifting allegiance could be a coup for the Australian Republic Movement, led by rugby player-turned-journalist Peter FitzSimons (right, with wife Lisa Wilkinson)

Australia’s Republican Movement unveiled in January its preferred method for the nation to appoint a new head of state.

The group says federal, state and territorial parliaments should nominate a shortlist of candidates for the head of state, which would then be put to a nationwide ballot of voters.

The federal parliament could appoint up to three people while the states and territories would appoint one person each.

The winner of the poll would get a five-year term and be responsible for appointing a prime minister with majority support in the House of Representatives, or calling an election if that support does not exist.

But the head of state would have no authority in day-to-day governance or passing laws.

The model was developed over a two-year period, with over 10,000 Australians consulted through surveys, polls and meetings.

Survey

Is Peter FitzSimons’ Australian Republic model a good idea?

  • Yes 356 votes
  • No 1184 votes
  • Undecided 85 votes

WARC chairman Peter FitzSimons said the ‘Australian Choice’ model gave citizens the responsibility to elect their own leaders.

“It will give all Australian voters a merit-based choice as to who speaks for them as head of state,” he said.

“The decision will be in their hands, unlike now where it’s luck of the draw that we get from the British Royal Family.”

Research into the movement found that 73% of Australians would vote for a republic if the model went to a referendum.

He also revealed that 92% of Australians are open to the idea of ​​a republic, with just 8% opposed to any change.

Mr FitzSimons said having a specific model to enable change overcame the movement’s main hurdle.

“We consulted, we listened carefully and Australians told us that this approach would give our nation the best chance of success in a referendum, with an overwhelming majority of Australians likely to support change,” he said. -he declares.

However, Australian Monarchist League national chairman Philip Benwell disagreed with this characterization, calling the model “deeply flawed” and said it empowered politicians rather than the people.

“AML is thrilled that ARM has, after more than 20 years, finally produced a model,” he said.

“However, although their model is called the ‘choice model’, people actually have no choice who they vote for because only politicians will decide on the candidates, which rather defeats the purpose. to have a national vote.”

New plan: Australia's Republican Movement, led by Peter FitzSimons, unveiled in January its preferred method for the nation to appoint a new head of state

New plan: Australia’s Republican Movement, led by Peter FitzSimons, unveiled in January its preferred method for the nation to appoint a new head of state

Labor frontbenchers Mark Dreyfus and Matt Thistlethwaite praised WARC for its model.

“Australia’s head of state should be one of us: an Australian who lives with the Australian people,” they said.

“While constitutional recognition and a voice in Parliament for First Nations peoples remains the Labor Party’s priority for constitutional reform, it is important that all Australians have the opportunity to consider an Australian Head of State in the future and the best model of appointment.”

They said the nation needed its own head of state who reflected Australia’s maturity, independence and unique identity.

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